Tag Archives: HDSLR Workflow

The importance of Sound Design/Recording!

23 Jul

It’s been a while since I have done a post, in the midst of Graduation and finally finding some hope of a good creative job I decided that Sound is what really makes a film. I have been working hard creating motion graphics and this gave me a really good opportunity to be more experimental and creative with sound so I thought it would be nice to share some tips I have come across.

For me sound design & recording comes quite naturally, my A levels where in music technology and I have been through the process of recording bands e.t.c (a skill I would advise any film-maker to gain). It’s often said sound is 51% of a film and I totally agree, an audience will tolerate bad video if the sound is good but never vice versa.  Sound is particularly important to get right when shooting with a DSLR because most of the time you cannot rely on the sound these cameras take in, time and time again I see interviews shot with a DSLR looking amazing but sounding terrible, don’t fall into this trap: Continue reading

FINALLY! The new Canon t4i/650D has arrived + NEW LENSES!

8 Jun

The New EOS Rebel T4i DSLR Camera Puts the power and creativity of DSLR Stills and Video at your fingertips
Silent and Continuous Autofocus in Video, The EOS Rebel T4i Lets People Re-Live Magic Moments Through Stunningly Crisp Video and Incredible Stereo Sound

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., June 8, 2012 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, today announced a new flagship model in its most popular EOS Rebel line, the Canon EOS Rebel T4i Digital SLR Camera. The new EOS Rebel T4i features incredible image quality with an 18-megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor, DIGIC 5 Image Processor that helps capture all the action with high-speed continuous shooting of up to five frames per second (fps) and an extended ISO range of 100–12800 (expandable to 25600 in H mode) that gives photographers the opportunities to take the EOS Rebel T4i into more shooting situations than ever before. Continue reading

My Top 6 Film Making Tips!

31 May

SHOOT:  don’t do what almost every film maker does when there starting out and start obsessing over gear. ‘Oh I need this to shoot this and I can’t do that shot with out this e.t.c.’ This cycle will never end so its good to snap out of it quickly. If you cant get the gear FIND A WAY AROUND IT. If its your first film then it’s probably not going to look brilliant, get over it everybody starts like that. Take the experience as a practice for that one big film your working towards, the one that’s going to really show of your creativity. Shoot regardless of anything, get the practice and once you have shot, don’t stop. Go out and shoot something random, practice with your camera, you need to get to know it like the back of your hand. STAY PASSIONATE! Continue reading

Colour Grading Tips (why it is important)

30 May

Colour grading is often overlooked by the amateur film makers but its something that can make or break the overall response of your film. A good story with good content is always key but time after time I find my self watching Vimeo films where someone has got their Canon 550D, shot a nice story with some good sympathy building around the characters and they totally skimp out on any kind of post production grading. For me its one of the strongest methods of pulling some one into the story your trying to tell. When you see a film at the Movies chances are its going to be heavily graded, especially a story that rely’s on some kind of fiction as its basis, i.e Terminator Salvation. This is a good example because its colour grading is very apocalyptic to suit when in time it is based, in fact, there’s only two real colours to the film, grey and green. Often people use simple 3 way colour correction methods to colour grade and try to pick out a natural skin tone colour. I feel you shouldnt hold back on changing people’s skin tones and effect the colour of the world the film is based. Start simple, level all the clips to match tonally and get all those skin-tones looking skin tone colour, then push your grade to suit the world your film is based within. A good colour grader will need know all of these tools:

  • Curves
  • Levels
  • Saturation
  • Lift, Gamma, Gain
  • Shadows, Mid-tones, Hi-lights
  • Blacks, Mid’s, whites
  • Masks(vignettes e.t.c)

Remember when your shooting video and you know your going to grade it after make sure you shoot as FLAT as possible. What do I mean by this, no in camera sharpening , less saturation and no noise reduction. check out this video for setting your flat picture profile’s, this video also goes through some other settings you will need: Continue reading